BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

BHS+Geology+students+gather+for+lunch+at+Red+Rocks+Amphitheater+to+study+the+geology+of+the+amphitheater+comprised+of+a+300+million+year+old+rock+formation+%28fountain+formation%29+that+has+been+uplifted+from+depths+as+deep+as+10%2C000+feet+below.
BHS Geology students gather for lunch at Red Rocks Amphitheater to study the geology of the amphitheater comprised of a 300 million year old rock formation (fountain formation) that has been uplifted from depths as deep as 10,000 feet below.

BHS Geology students gather for lunch at Red Rocks Amphitheater to study the geology of the amphitheater comprised of a 300 million year old rock formation (fountain formation) that has been uplifted from depths as deep as 10,000 feet below.

BHS Geology students gather for lunch at Red Rocks Amphitheater to study the geology of the amphitheater comprised of a 300 million year old rock formation (fountain formation) that has been uplifted from depths as deep as 10,000 feet below.

Kevin Sullivan, BHS Science Teacher

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






BHS geology students have been studying the front range geology and how items like the flat-irons, red rocks and other formations were created and what the geology reveals about the past history of Colorado (once an ocean, once a desert, once a jungle, once lush grassland and once river bed).

We first visited the Morrison Museum of Natural History and studied what sort of Dinosaurs lived in the Morrison area, we visited red rocks and observed many geological formations and saw how it was uplifted from far below (Red Rocks formation goes approximately 10,000 feet below the city of Denver).

We then observed the geology of the Morrison and Dakota formations that make up Dinosaur Ridge and looked at the ripple marks in the rock indicating a river environment at that time.  And of course we saw Dinosaur tracks as well.

This trip is a precursor to our rocks unit we will start soon.

Students observe rocks from the Dakota formation showing ripple marks in the rock which indicate a wet river bed climate in the area.

Ms. Kiersten Lewis (student teacher in the science department) points out dinosaur tracks found in the rocks along Dinosaur Ridge.

BHS Junior Lucas Been works on uncovering a fossil from rock inside a fossil lab at the Morrison Museum of Natural History using an air chisel.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    News

    One for the Record Books

  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    News

    World News

  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    Opinion

    Colorado Still Ageist in Politics

  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    Sports

    State Cross Country

  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    Sports

    BHS Mountain Bike Team Wins State

  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    Opinion

    Lanyard Cartoon

  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    News

    One for the Record Books

  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    News

    World News

  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    Entertainment

    Haunted House Co-Creator Interview

  • BHS Geology Hits the Rocks

    Opinion

    The iPhone and the Culture Around it.

Navigate Right
BHS Geology Hits the Rocks