Are Trump Supporters Anti-Human Rights?

Those+attending+this+Trump+rally+on+October+4%2C+2016%2C+thought+the+signs+in+their+hands+were+solely+in+support+of+Donald+Trump%2C+however%2C+they+have+a+different+message+attached+to+them.+Via+Gage+Skidmore.

Those attending this Trump rally on October 4, 2016, thought the signs in their hands were solely in support of Donald Trump, however, they have a different message attached to them. Via Gage Skidmore.

As the political climate grows increasingly hostile by the day due to the upcoming presidential election, the parties are more polarized than ever. Teens are getting into political debates via social media, and the emotional connection many have to this political era is fragile and traumatic. Generation Z is finally coming onto the political scene. They are raising an important question: is this a battle of politics anymore, or is it one fighting for human rights?

Right-wing politicians frequently question why others–particularly those on the left–can’t respect their political beliefs. While we have walked onto a progressively more politically tolerant era, you will find many people unwilling to associate with those from the other side. Frequently, the reasoning behind this mindset is not different parties, but rather the different views the parties have adopted involving human rights and the legislation and actions surrounding it.

An issue involving this is the skewed indoctrination around human rights that Trump and his administration are feeding to his followers. For example–in a political debate I was involved in–the opposing party told me that there is no way that Trump doesn’t support the LQBTQ+ community, as he says that he loves them. To this, I rebutted with an article that clearly laid out all of the legislation that Trump had either passed or had tried to pass directly against the community. This isn’t as much a political issue, but one about the inhibiting of human rights and how this person, in particular, supports a man trying to lessen them for this community significantly. This is an obvious example of how much people are willing to blindly follow a political leader simply on the basis of their party. As long as they are of that party, they will continuously pursue them without regard, despite the severe consequences upon human rights. According to The Washington Post, Trump has made more than 20,000 false or misleading statements since he took office. According to Now This, he averaged one false statement every 56 seconds.

In 2020, this is very applicable to the current events surrounding Black Lives Matter and other similar issues. Although Black Lives Matter is a viable and important issue, members of the right-wing formed All Lives Matter as a direct assault on the campaign. It is not merely a phrase to say that all lives truly matter, but one that was explicitly made to undermine Black Lives Matter. They do not believe that systemic racism exists, which has been consistently proven by statistics and testimonials; however, because Trump has voiced his support, it has grown numerous followers. Again, this is not a political issue, or what should be considered politics by people; it is one strictly involving the rights and treatment of a minority. By supporting All Lives Matter, people are establishing themselves as overtly racist and anti-equality. 

Those that follow Trump, whether they deny it or not, automatically condone misogyny, xenophobia, racism, homophobia, sexism, white supremacy, and attack on the environment. Many of those that consider themselves involved in the political scene will tend to support most of the policies of a candidate for president; however Trump supporters have formed a cult atmosphere wherein they decidedly support every single one of Trump’s actions with violent fervor. Despite their frequent denial of their racism and homophobia, countless quotes would prove otherwise. Trump supporters, however, upon being faced with these quotes in a debate or argument, will say something along the lines of “the quote was taken out of context,” or “he was just joking around.” However, isn’t it completely politically incorrect for a president to be joking about these things?

The confusion that the current political scene produces is this: Do the majority of national issues involving minorities and human rights qualify as politics? Who gets to draw that line? Is a black person’s ability not to get shot by a cop for walking around a neighborhood politics? Right-winged Trump supporters continue to support his political regime as he actively attempts to reduce human rights, so maybe it’s finally time to establish his opinions as morally invalid.